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More Topics
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Table of Contents

  • Sudden Hearing Loss 
    • Sudden hearing loss (SHL) (also called sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) or sudden deafness) is *always* a "medical emergency," even if you have experienced previous hearing loss and even if previous treatments did not restore hearing.  Immediate medical attention to sudden hearing loss can often restore some or all of the lost hearing. 
    • Just because you have Meniere's Disease doesn't mean you can't also develop some other disorder that is causing the sudden hearing loss, such as a mini-stroke that is blocking the flow of blood to the inner ear.  There is a very short golden window of opportunity (perhaps a day or two; maybe less and maybe more) in which to treat sudden hearing loss.  This is not a situation for a general practitioner.  This is a situation for a doctor who specializes in hearing, preferably an otologist or, ever better, a neurotologist.  (For resources to help you to find a doctor, visit our Doctors Page.)  If you try to get an appointment with a doctor, tell the appointments clerk that you have sudden hearing loss and need to be squeezed in *immediately.*  If you can't get an immediate appointment, go to an emergency room.  Or just go to an emergency room in the first place.  Don't waste any time.  Time lost may be hearing lost.  You cannot go wrong by *immediately* seeking a doctor when you have sudden hearing loss.  Many times, some or all of the lost hearing can be restored if treated quickly enough.  DO NOT DELAY!
    • Click here to search PubMed for "sudden hearing loss" or "sudden sensorineural hearing loss" or "sudden deafness."
    • Click here to search Google on this subject.
  • Air Travel and Sea Cruises 
    • Air Travel and Vertiginous Attacks
      • We haven't seen any authoritative studies on this subject.  Sometimes a reason for concern is the fact that Meniere's Disease causes fullness -- a sense of air pressure in the middle ear -- and patients may wonder whether flying will make it worse.  However, the sense of air pressure in the middle ear is a false sense.  Meniere's Disease does not affect the middle ear.  Meniere's Disease does not cause actual air pressure in the middle ear -- it just feels that way. Of course, one can have a separate middle ear problem (such as a cold, other infection, Eustachian tube dysfunction, etc.) in addition to Meniere's Disease. Some patients are sensitive to weather-related atmospheric pressure changes while on the ground where they live, and they may wonder whether aircraft cabin air pressure changes will cause them a problem.
      • Our own experience, and the anecdotal experience of many other patients, is that most fly with absolutely no problem at all. However, once in a while a patient will report a problem with flying.  Remember that a fluctuation or episode can occur at any time, and one should always be prepared. We suggest you discuss this with your doctor before you leave, and be sure to carry with you any medications that your doctor may prescribe. You may want to make sure that your seat has a vomit bag handy before you take off, just in case.  The vast majority of patients seem to fly with no problems at all. We hope that you are one of them. 
      • Keywords:  triggers, travel, flying, air travel, flight, airplane, airplanes, airline, airlines, cabin, cabins, pressurization, ascending, descending.
    • Sea Cruises and Vertiginous Attacks
      • We haven't seen any authoritative studies on this subject.  The anecdotal experience of many patients is that most don't have a problem and some do.  (Much like all things Meniere's.)  Remember that a fluctuation or episode can occur at any time, and one should always be prepared. We suggest you discuss this with your doctor before you leave, and be sure to carry with you any medications that your doctor may prescribe.
      • Keywords:  sea cruise, sea travel, cruise ship, seasickness, ocean cruise.
         

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